Subscribe to our Newsletter

Amplero’s software, relying on algorithms designed to detect patterns in data, aims to thread through companies’ existing sales and marketing tools, running small experiments to find optimal ways for businesses to communicate with their customers.

Seattle startup Amplero has bagged $17.5 million in investment, which the company plans to put to work building out its machine-learning-powered software for business marketers.

Amplero’s software, relying on algorithms designed to detect patterns in data, aims to thread through companies’ existing sales and marketing tools, running small experiments to find optimal ways for businesses to communicate with their customers.

The startup was spun out of Seattle invoicing-software company Globys last year. Olly Downs, formerly Globys’ chief technology officer, leads the firm, which has about 45 employees.

Businesses with few customers, Downs said, can tailor their messages for individual customers.

“But when you get millions, tens of millions, hundreds of millions of consumers, addressing them in a way that matches their profile and context and behavior is almost impossible,” he said. Amplero’s software aims to help fix that by producing automated recommendations for customer outreach, such as recommending when or how to reach out to customers to suggest buying a new product.

Amplero’s own customers include Sprint, Microsoft’s Xbox and Office units, and Tukwila-based credit union BECU.

The investment round disclosed Tuesday, which brings Amplero’s total outside investment to $25 million, was led by Greycroft and Bellevue-based Ignition Partners. Existing investors Wildcat Venture Partners, Seven Peaks Ventures and Trilogy Equity Partners also participated in the latest round, the company said.

Bob Kelly, the Ignition managing partner who led the venture capital firm’s investment, said marketers at big firms can be left trying to sort through data from 30 different tools.

“But none of them are connected in this fashion; you have all of these disparate silos,” he said.

Plenty of companies see a potentially lucrative market in bringing artificial intelligence-like capabilities to bear to link those products, Kelly said. “Amplero is one that has a real shot,” he said, at capitalizing on that opportunity.

This story was found here

Views: 213

© 2017   BigDataNews.com is a subsidiary of DataScienceCentral LLC and not affiliated with Systap   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service